Number of results 25 for broadcast

16/04/2014 - Let the audience decide your fate in new Twitch-backed game

When some 1.1 million people played Pokémon together via Twitch's game-broadcasting service, developer Studio Bean must've gotten inspired. Choice Chamber takes the idea of the audience deciding what happens onscreen to a new level and injects Twitch chat into the game's DNA; here, the peanut gallery has a direct impact on the player's progression. As you make your way through a series of randomly generated rooms, the audience (people watching you broadcast via Twitch, of course) takes a series of polls that alter the game's flow. It's a lot like playing as dungeon master with your Dungeons and Dragons crew, but with a 21st century twist. As cool as voting on what weapon the player gets, or summoning a giant fist that wipes across the screen to obliterate a boss monster sounds, though, the project is only halfway to its $30,000 Kickstarter funding goal. With four days left in the campaign, Twitch has announced that it'll step in and match the funds needed to finish the game.

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Source: Kickster, Twitch.tv


01/04/2014 - On Xbox One, game broadcasters are quickly catching up to PlayStation 4

Though Xbox One sales may be slightly behind that of the PlayStation 4, it looks like game broadcasting is taking off at a much quicker pace on Microsoft's new console. In the first week of availability, 108K Xbox One owners took to Twitch to broadcast games; the same number was reached on the PlayStation 4 after 25 days of availability. This is largely due to Twitch broadcasting launching alongside the PS4, whereas broadcasting didn't function on the Xbox One until early last month -- resultantly, millions of Xbox One consoles were already out in the wild, whereas the PS4 had to be physically purchased and brought home before users discovered the glory of ... mostly safe for work broadcasts. It also didn't hurt that the Xbox One had its first major exclusive game, Titanfall, launching alongside game broadcasting (we even got in on the fun ourselves). Regardless, it looks like game broadcasting is proving more than just a passing fad.

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25/02/2014 - Xbox One gets gameplay broadcasting in March update

Xbox One owners eagerly awaiting Titanfall should be glad to hear that the Xbox One's gameplay broadcasting functionality will light up ahead of the game's March 11th launch. Included in the second half of the first big Xbox One update is Twitch gameplay broadcasting, enabling users to share gameplay via Twitch.tv (similar functionality already exists in Sony's PlayStation 4). That update is expected just ahead of March 11th.

Gameplay broadcasting on Xbox One was one of the tentpole features touted at the console's unveil event last year -- the service was delayed ahead of launch, with Xbox lead Marc Whitten telling us at CES to expect it before gaming's big trade show in June. No real reason is given for the delay; Xbox marketing lead Yusuf Mehdi told the AP that Sony's version of gameplay broadcasting is, "too limiting," and Microsoft wanted to take its time to get it right. It's not clear what that actually means in practice just yet, but rest assured we're asking Microsoft for more info.

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Source: AP


19/11/2013 - Xbox One gameplay broadcasting delayed to 'the first part of 2014'

It sure is good that Microsoft's Xbox One controller doesn't have a "Share" button dedicated to pushing live broadcasts of gameplay to the internet, because that functionality is being delayed beyond the console's November 22nd launch date. Microsoft confirmed as much this morning in a cursory footnote in a larger piece about the Twitch.tv app, which reads, "We are working to ensure the initial Twitch on Xbox One broadcasting experience meets the expectations of the Twitch community." It sounds like, as it stands now, broadcasting via Xbox One isn't up to snuff for release.

"While this feature won't be available right away, we'll let you know as soon as it is ready," the note continues. "Our goal is to deliver it during the first part of 2014." We've yet to use the Xbox One's broadcasting since first hearing about it during the console's debut event last May. To be clear, the Twitch.tv app is different from the ability to broadcast gameplay through Twitch.

In addition to the delay news, Microsoft released a video of Twitch.tv's app in action, which enables viewing of gameplay broadcasts (it's below the break). Hilariously, this will allow Xbox One players to watch live gameplay from other game platforms, just not the one they're using. Womp womp.

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Source: Xbox Wire


12/06/2013 - CRTC to ask Canadians for help in adapting TV regulations to the internet era

CRTC asks for input on rethinking Canadian TV in the streaming era

The CRTC is eager to shake the cobwebs from Canada's TV regulations, many of which got their start before cable arrived, let alone Netflix or YouTube. Accordingly, it's planning a round of consultations in the fall that will ask both the public and the industry what rules they want to change. Chairman Jean-Pierre Blais expects the discussion to center around the CRTC's approach to internet content -- some of the old licensing restrictions might not apply when it's easier to both publish and watch online video. The agency isn't likely to create a utopia full of cord cutting and à la carte TV subscriptions, but its recent attempts at fixing a broken cellular market give us hope that at least a few broadcasting policies could change for the better.

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Via: The Globe and Mail

Source: CRTC


30/08/2012 - NHK developing hybrid renewable energy-powered video camera for use in disaster areas

NHK developing hybrid renewable energypowered camera for use in disaster areas

You can always count on Japan's NHK to come up with new, exciting and innovative ways to bring us video coverage. The latest project? A wind- and solar-powered robot camera designed for situations such as natural disasters. Loaded with a 1,200 Ah battery, even if the elements don't bless it with sun and air, it can keep filming for two to three days. The combination of wind turbine and solar panels obviously allow it to generate more power than either method on its own, with the turbine reportedly generating 1 kW at 11 m/s wind speeds. A special power-saving mode prevent it draining too fast when full functionality -- such as the built-in wireless, cellular and satellite broadcasting systems aren't needed. Currently the prototype is installed on a rooftop while battery and power-generation are fully tested, but it's hoped that this could lead to further developments for disaster area broadcast equipment. Or -- here's hoping -- power-cut-proof sports coverage.

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NHK developing hybrid renewable energy-powered video camera for use in disaster areas originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 29 Aug 2012 18:56:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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19/04/2012 - Hauppauge announces StreamEez to broadcast live HD video
Hauppauge announces StreamEez to broadcast live HD video

17/04/2012 - JVC demos GY-HM600, launches HM650 Mobile News Camera with WiFi and FTP at NAB

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Sure, you can always roll up with a full-blown sat truck or a camera tethered to a ViaSat SurfBeam 2 Pro Portable, or you can pick up the JVC GY-HM650, which lets you beam those video bytes back to base with any ole hotspot. The company's Mobile News Camera packs a trio of 1/3-inch 1080p 12-bit sensors, a 29-667mm lens, 3.5-inch LCD, SDXC compatibility and HD-SDI outputs, but it also includes WiFi connectivity with FTP server support, letting you record then automatically transmit footage back to a newsroom for editing and broadcast. The camera itself is very compact, considering that it's primarily suited for professional news applications, and also includes all the standard audio hook-ups, like dual XLR jacks, a shotgun mic holder, headphone jack and a separate connector for a wireless mic receiver, along with GPS and Android/iOS app control. JVC also launched another model, the GY-HM600, which offers similar features, save for those wireless connectivity bits. Both cameras look nearly identical, though the company only had the less-abled 600 on display at NAB. That camera will retail for $4,695 when it hits in the fall, while the 650 will cost you $1,000 more, with a winter 2012 shipping estimate. We weren't able to peek at the WiFi model at the show, but you'll be able to get a fairly good idea of how that camera will look in the glass-enclosed HM600 shots below.

Continue reading JVC demos GY-HM600, launches HM650 Mobile News Camera with WiFi and FTP at NAB

JVC demos GY-HM600, launches HM650 Mobile News Camera with WiFi and FTP at NAB originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 17 Apr 2012 15:15:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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17/04/2012 - Livestream Broadcaster hands-on

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According to CEO Max Haot the logical next step for Livestream -- now well established as a reliable service for bringing live video feeds to the internet -- is just to get more people distributing live video by any means necessary. To that end, the company is jumping into the hardware business with this palm-sized Livestream Broadcaster unit that just went up for preorders a few days ago. With a subsidized price of $495, it connects to video cameras directly over HDMI then reencodes and uploads the video on the fly to the company's servers (unlimited streaming costs $45 per month, each encoder comes with three months free) via Ethernet, WiFi or a 3G / 4G USB dongle. Even on the wireless-internet challenged LVCC floor it was sending several streams and enabling user control via buttons on the unit itself, or remotely from a PC or iPhone / iPad. These boxes are still on target to ship at the end of May and and showed off everything those without the backing of a tech / media conglomerate (cough), like small businesses or independent bloggers, would need to make their productions available for viewing as they happen.

Continue reading Livestream Broadcaster hands-on

Livestream Broadcaster hands-on originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 17 Apr 2012 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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13/04/2012 - Livestream Broadcaster pre-orders available now, shipping at the end of May for $495
Livestream Broadcaster pre-orders available now, shipping at the end of May for $495
A vivid memory of Cisco's would-be FlipLive streaming camera is all we've got, but thankfully there's existing devices out there like the Livestream Broadcaster to help fill that void. Priced at a whopping $495, Livestream's Broadcaster allows it to be paired with an array of shooters via HDMI and used to stream live high-def vids to any Livestream-equipped device over Ethernet, WiFi, or with a 3G / 4G USB dongle. Aside from being capable of sending out 1080i waves, the Broadcaster can also push 720p and 480i resolutions (in case you don't feel like being a bandwidth hog), while all video and audio encoding is done with H.264 and ACC, respectively. It's also worth noting that the near 500 bucks includes a three-month sub to Livestream's service, which usually costs an extra $45 per month. For now, this bright red streamer's only available to Euros and Americans, with shipping set to commence by May 31st.

Livestream Broadcaster pre-orders available now, shipping at the end of May for $495 originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 13 Apr 2012 06:02:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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09/01/2012 - Samsung N Service unveiled at CES: Time Warner Cable, DirecTV, Comcast and Verizon onboard
Well, what have we here? Looks as if Samsung's cooking up quite the content partnership here at CES 2012, with Verizon, DirecTV, Time Warner Cable and Comcast (at least) onboard. From a content creation standpoint, NBC Universal is evidently signed on to crack open its coffers and let the material pour fourth, and we're guessing we'll hear of quite a few more once the announcement gets official. As of now, the so-called N Service looks to be one that'll enable select pay-TV subscribers to stream content onto Samsung devices -- hopefully whilst far, far away from home. At least for FiOS TV users, those who take advantage of N Service will be able to "access live streaming FiOS TV channels, as well as Flex View commercial movies and TV shows from one's Samsung Smart TV or Blu-ray player." It'll obviously work with multi-room households, too. Have a peek at the detail shots below, and keep it locked right here as we learn more.

Samsung N Service unveiled at CES: Time Warner Cable, DirecTV, Comcast and Verizon onboard originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 09 Jan 2012 14:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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21/04/2011 - NBC Sports Group locks up NHL broadcasts for 10 years, plans to rename Versus
While we enjoy the NHL Playoffs, the NBC Sports Group (which now includes Versus thanks to the whole merger with Comcast) has announced a 10-year TV deal (rumored to be worth around $2 billion) with the league that keeps NBC and Versus as the exclusive broadcast homes for pro hockey. Beyond just broadcast, the deal also covers digital rights across "all platforms and devices" and includes provisions for more special event games, check the press release after the break for more details. Broadcasting & Cable mentions chairman Dick Ebersol said on a conference call Versus is also due for a rebranding now that the merger is completed, so expect a new channel with the letters "NBC" in it -- lets all hope this works out better than "Syfy" -- sometime soon.

Continue reading NBC Sports Group locks up NHL broadcasts for 10 years, plans to rename Versus

NBC Sports Group locks up NHL broadcasts for 10 years, plans to rename Versus originally appeared on Engadget HD on Wed, 20 Apr 2011 22:53:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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04/10/2010 - Poll: Has broadcast HD picture quality gotten worse over the years?
Comcast compression
High Definition television might be over 10 years old, but it is hardly perfect. Which makes us wonder on this Sunday afternoon, has broadcast HD picture quality gotten worse or better over the years? Sure, we've seen some especially heinous acts by DirecTV with its HD Lite, and then there was Comcast's shameful compression, and more recently there have been plenty of complaints about AT&T's U-Verse. But overall we wonder, has it gotten better or worse?

Poll: Has broadcast HD picture quality gotten worse over the years? originally appeared on Engadget HD on Sun, 03 Oct 2010 18:38:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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15/12/2009 - LG expects to sell 3.8 million 3D LCDs by 2011, partners with Korean broadcaster SkyLife
Well, this sure marks a change of tone for LG. After taking the cautious approach and throwing out a single 3D TV model in 2009, the Korean manufacturer is now boldly predicting sales of 400,000 3D units in 2010 and 3.4 million in 2011. To make it all happen, the company has announced it will introduce a "wide range" of 3D TV sets measuring between 42 and 72 inches diagonally, with flagship models among them. Furthermore, LG's new partnership with SkyLife will see both companies investing in 3D content creation, as the digital satellite broadcaster will be pitching in $25 million. Naturally, this Korean push is merely a prelude to a planned assault on American and European markets next year, which LG expects will jump all over 3D given its internal survey data indicating 58 percent of people want an extra dimension to their viewing experience. What we're most excited about, though, is the "ultra-slim" bezel you see in the picture -- it is no accident or mere prototype, and its minimization is part of LG's effort to maximize immersion. We like it, 3D or not.

LG expects to sell 3.8 million 3D LCDs by 2011, partners with Korean broadcaster SkyLife originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 15 Dec 2009 04:19:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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02/12/2009 - FCC boss keeps driving home the 'spectrum, spectrum, spectrum' message for wireless broadband
Love him or hate him, it seems destined that the FCC's Julius Genachowski will leave as big of a mark on the agency he's leading -- if not bigger -- than his predecessor Kevin Martin did, because he's hell-bent on shaking up the wireless airwaves and landlines he oversees in some pretty huge ways. Pushback from broadcasters is apparently quite strong, but he's reiterated at a conference today that he intends to investigate freeing up TV spectrum for to make room additional wide-area wireless services, a move that certainly seems to make sense on the surface considering that universal broadband to the home -- which could carry all the TV you'd ever need -- is also high on Genachowski's to-do list. The Universal Service Fund, which every American phone subscriber pays into and partly finances rural landline telephone operations where profits are harder to come by, is looking like a ripe target for renovation to bring broadband into the fold, theoretically making high-speed data more accessible to folks of all demographics and geographical affinities. Like the TV spectrum move, the USF realignment is meeting its fair share of detractors -- mainly among rural landline operators who rely on the funds for operation, of course -- but we're definitely gaining confidence that this dude isn't taking "no" for an answer in the long term.

FCC boss keeps driving home the 'spectrum, spectrum, spectrum' message for wireless broadband originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 01 Dec 2009 21:49:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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30/06/2009 - Major US Broadcaster Networks Claim 53% Of Free Online TV

The major US broadcasters are evolving into multi-platform TV distribution networks in a "land-grab" attempt to replicate their traditional channels business online.
So much so that the online web-based TV services of the four major US TV networks – together with Hulu, the joint venture between NBC Universal, News Corporation and Disney - accounted for 53 per cent of an ad-supported US online TV market, according to a report from Screen Digest.

30/04/2009 - BSkyB's Revenues Rise As HD Subscribers Double

It's taken a while but HDTV seems to have firmly established itself in the UK - underlined by the latest surge in subscriber numbers for BSkyB.
The satellite broadcaster has seen its HD base leap to more than one million subscribers - up 32 per cent on the previous quarter and more than double the 465,000 who signed up last year.

03/03/2009 - I-Movix Launches SprintCam V3 Broadcast-Integrated HD Ultra Slow-Motion Solution

I-Movix has launched the first broadcast-integrated, native HD, ultra-slow-motion solution offering frame rates of 500 to 1,000 fps with instant replay.
The new SprintCam V3 HD produces slow-motion output equivalent to 20 to 40 times slower than normal speed, which the Belgian company says makes it the most advanced HD system available with full broadcast integration.

05/02/2009 - NHK shows off new wireless HDTV broadcast camera

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Taking time off of its always-impressive Super Hi-Vision program, Japan's NHK took the wraps off its latest development, a wireless broadcast camera capable of less than 33ms delay per frame. Apparently current tech has about a .5 second lag time, but this one updates microwave tech to millimeter waveband, letting it switch between wired and wireless cameramen with no interruption. The cameras already got put to use in the 59th NHK Kohaku Utagassen music show, don't be surprised to see a lot more freely moving camera jockeys at live broadcasts in the U.S. very soon.

NHK shows off new wireless HDTV broadcast camera originally appeared on Engadget HD on Wed, 04 Feb 2009 21:34:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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29/01/2009 - Bid To Delay US Switch To Digital TV Fails

A bill intended to delay the US's transition to digital TV has been defeated in the House of Representatives.
An estimated 6.5 million Americans are not yet prepared for the switch, which now reverts back to the original date of 17 February.

15/01/2009 - Netherlands' SBS seeking nominal yearly fees to pay for HD broadcasts

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No one ever said the spoils of high-definition came free, and no one knows that better than Dutch commercial broadcaster SBS. The outfit is reportedly holding its hand out and covering its face while asking for payments between €2 to €3 per year, per subscriber, from cable operators in order to pay for HD broadcasts. That's according to Eric Eljon, MD of SBS Productions, who hopes to begin high-def simulcasts within a few months should a deal be reached. In The Netherlands today, there is no license fee at all, with the public broadcasting system paid for out of the general budget; additionally, there's currently no way to recoup the massive increase in cost when switching to HD via advertising alone. C'mon, cable carriers / consumers -- just think of the HD starved children.

[Thanks, Wouter]

Netherlands' SBS seeking nominal yearly fees to pay for HD broadcasts originally appeared on Engadget HD on Thu, 15 Jan 2009 08:19:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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13/01/2009 - Europe To See Presidential Inuguration in HD

The upcoming US presidential inauguration will be broadcast in Europe in high definition for the first time ever following "unprecedented demand" from broadcasters.
Eurovision is to offer European broadcasters access to full HDTV coverage of the ceremony, Barack Obama's speech and motorcade beamed from cameras on location in Washington DC.

24/12/2008 - Could you live on online TV / Netflix alone? One gal found out.

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It's bound to have crossed your mind a time or two: "Could I ditch my pay-TV and still stay entertained?" With the advent of HTPCs and boxes such as the ZvBox, entertainment truly has been disconnected from the coaxial jack that sits quietly behind your TV. Practically every broadcast network (and even a few cable channels) places their hit shows online for viewing, and a whole litany of other internet TV portals are but a URL away. A mettlesome AP writer decided to give it a go for a week, abstaining from live broadcast TV, cable and pay-per-view content; in essence, she survived solely on internet media and Netflix. The nicely journaled experience is a must-read, as it details what she did with her newfound free time and how she coped without the luxuries of DVR and limitless content. At the end of the seven days, she concluded that she could indeed live sans pay-TV so long as she had good broadcast reception, but she still couldn't answer the all-important "but, would I want to?" On that note, would you?

Could you live on online TV / Netflix alone? One gal found out. originally appeared on Engadget HD on Wed, 24 Dec 2008 08:01:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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15/12/2008 - Top 10 HD sports broadcasts of 2008 -- do you agree?

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We know, they're essentially meaningless in the grand scheme of things, but there's something about these "top lists" that just warms our hearts. Arlen Schweiger over at Electronic House took a long, hard look back at all the sports he consumed over the course of this year in order to compile a best-of-the-best list for HD content. We don't want to give away any spoilers before you give the read link a visit, but let's just say "Texas tips Oklahoma," "Giants Freeze Packers" and "Celtics Return to Glory" are scattered about in there somewhere. And while we're on the subject, what's your top 10 high-def sports list of 2008?

Top 10 HD sports broadcasts of 2008 -- do you agree? originally appeared on Engadget HD on Mon, 15 Dec 2008 14:47:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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10/12/2008 - USB Device Plays HD Content On PC

DiBcom has launched an HD-ready digital terrestrial decoder in a USB key device that gives viewers free high-def content on their PCs.
The French mobile TV hardware maker claims the device is a world first - other manufacturers are already offering USB devices that receive over-the-air HD broadcasts although not in such a small package.

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