Number of results 25 for bandwidth

23/02/2014 - Netflix coughs up cash to solve Comcast traffic woes

Comcast should see its ranking in Netflix's speed report begin to recover after the two reached an agreement that reportedly has the streaming giant paying the provider directly to ensure more bandwidth. The exact details of the deal are a little murky, but it's a long term contract that will have Comcast connecting to Netflix servers inside third-party data centers. The company has previously sought to have its servers placed directly inside Comcast's data centers, but the new arrangement will still reduce Netflix's dependence on middlemen like Cogent. In a statement (available after the break), both companies call it a "mutually beneficial" agreement, confirming the direct connection some users noticed late last week. Many Internet companies have similar deals with ISPs to keep their content flowing smoothly, although there's no indication if an agreement with Verizon is in the works for similarly-troubled FiOS connections.

According to sources, the negotiations have been going on for over a year, including a CES meeting between CEOs Brian Roberts and Reed Hastings where the framework came together. While the timing is certainly suspect, the seemingly sudden resolution to the standoff has nothing to do with recent Net Neutrality developments or the proposed Time Warner acquisition. Still, the deal will certainly be used by Comcast as evidence that its merger should receive regulatory approval, even as it demonstrates the provider's growing leverage over content providers.

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Source: Comcast


13/02/2014 - Netflix report suggests Comcast and Verizon FiOS speeds are slipping

Netflix's latest ISP speed report is out and compared to what we've seen before, there are a few surprises. Comcast and Verizon FiOS have dropped quite a bit in the last four months, while Google Fiber is once again at the top of the heap. Neither Comcast nor Verizon have slumped to DSL speeds, but given Comcast's history with net neutrality and Big Red's stake in Redbox, some might call their decreased data rates into question. A J.P. Morgan analyst tells Recode that Netflix's top executives don't think that the telcos are throttling their users -- reinforcing the fine print at the bottom of the report. As The Consumerist points out, last October the streaming juggernaut altered how it measures downloads, which could explain why all of the measured speeds started shifting around then.

If those speeds don't match your in-home measurements, Netflix explains that the averages are well below peak speeds due to the different encodes used to pump movies and shows to your display, and can vary based on the networking gear in your house. So while the numbers may look discouraging, House of Cards will likely still look fine right where you are.

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Via: The Consumerist

Source: Netflix, Re/code


17/05/2012 - Comcast rethinks bandwidth caps, trials two new policies that involve higher 300GB monthly limits

Comcast's bandwidth policy has come under fire from several directions lately, and today it's announced plans to test two new systems for managing capacity. In a company blog post, VP Cathy Avgiris describes the new "flexible" approaches it will be testing out in certain markets that start off by raising the limit to 300GB (from 250GB where it's been since 2008) per month. One of the plans involves offering 300GB as a base on its Essentials, Economy, and Performance internet packages, and higher limits on its Blast and Extreme tiers, with extra data available as an add-on, possibly $10 for 50GB or so. The other plan simply bumps all tiers to 300GB per month and offers the additional blocks of data as needed. For markets where it's not testing the new plans, it's suspending enforcement of the 250GB cap entirely for now, although it says it will still contact "excessive" users about their usage.

We're currently on a conference call concerning the changes and Comcast is reaffirming its belief that the FCC has decided it can "manage" data usage on its network, and that it will continue to do so in a "non-discriminatory" way. Particularly since the launch of its Xfinity TV Xbox 360 app others like Netflix and some consumer and networking watchdogs would beg to differ, it will be interesting to see if these approaches change anything. Executives on the call noted "noise" around the Xbox 360 app in making the change, but also pointed to an "ongoing internal discussion" and simply that times have changed from four years ago. The words that keep coming up so far are choice and flexibility, as well as mentioning that even today, very few customers approach the previous 250GB limit. In response to a question, Avgiris indicated the median usage for customers is still around 8-10GB per month.We'll find out more like where the test markets are later, for now hit the source link for all the information currently available.

Update: Netflix has responded to the move, and it's about what you'd expect. In other words, it appreciates the notion, but it's still mad.

Comcast rethinks bandwidth caps, trials two new policies that involve higher 300GB monthly limits originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 May 2012 13:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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17/05/2012 - Comcast rethinks bandwidth caps, trials two new policies that involve higher 300GB monthly limits

Comcast's bandwidth policy has come under fire from several directions lately, and today it's announced plans to test two new systems for managing capacity. In a company blog post, VP Cathy Avgiris describes the new "flexible" approaches it will be testing out in certain markets that start off by raising the limit to 300GB (from 250GB where it's been since 2008) per month. One of the plans involves offering 300GB as a base on its Essentials, Economy, and Performance internet packages, and higher limits on its Blast and Extreme tiers, with extra data available as an add-on, possibly $10 for 50GB or so. The other plan simply bumps all tiers to 300GB per month and offers the additional blocks of data as needed. For markets where it's not testing the new plans, it's suspending enforcement of the 250GB cap entirely for now, although it says it will still contact "excessive" users about their usage.

We're currently on a conference call concerning the changes and Comcast is reaffirming its belief that the FCC has decided it can "manage" data usage on its network, and that it will continue to do so in a "non-discriminatory" way. Particularly since the launch of its Xfinity TV Xbox 360 app others like Netflix and some consumer and networking watchdogs would beg to differ, it will be interesting to see if these approaches change anything. Executives on the call noted "noise" around the Xbox 360 app in making the change, but also pointed to an "ongoing internal discussion" and simply that times have changed from four years ago. The words that keep coming up so far are choice and flexibility, as well as mentioning that even today, very few customers approach the previous 250GB limit. In response to a question, Avgiris indicated the median usage for customers is still around 8-10GB per month.We'll find out more like where the test markets are later, for now hit the source link for all the information currently available.

Update: Netflix has responded to the move, and it's about what you'd expect. In other words, it appreciates the notion, but it's still mad.

Comcast rethinks bandwidth caps, trials two new policies that involve higher 300GB monthly limits originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 17 May 2012 13:28:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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04/02/2012 - Netflix teams with eyeIO to lower bandwith use on movie night
Netflix teams with eyeIO to lower bandwith use on movie night
Kicking up a fuss about Netflix hogging all your bandwidth? Perhaps the company's latest partnership could induce a rapid change of heart. The streaming service has paired up with eyeIO in hopes of keeping bandwidth usage during streams to a minimum, which they claim won't affect the content's overall quality. While the joint venture just became official, the startup's "ultra-low-bandwidth" encoding technology -- that allegedly can reduce usage on a 720p HD stream by more than 50 percent -- began its testing phase on the streaming-giant's offerings months ago. Although eyeIO's service has already been implemented by Netflix, it's worth mentioning this isn't an exclusive deal, thus it's possible for its competition to jump on the bandwidth conservation bandwagon in the future. More importantly, we're interested to find out if you have noticed any difference in your streams lately, so drop us a line in the comments below.

Continue reading Netflix teams with eyeIO to lower bandwith use on movie night

Netflix teams with eyeIO to lower bandwith use on movie night originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 03 Feb 2012 21:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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16/07/2011 - Shaw Cable's Netflix competitor bypasses bandwidth caps on its way to the TV
While US residents seethe over increases in Netflix's pricing, our neighbors in Canada are upset by the competing Movie Club package Shaw Cable is offering. The $12 per month service offers unlimited access to "hundreds of the best Hollywood moves" and plans to have high definition feeds later this summer for an additional $5 (cable companies in the US have a similar scheme under the name Vutopia.) Causing the issue are promises that "the only limit is the number of hours in your day" unlike bandwidth capped streaming from unnamed services like Netflix. While Movie Club viewing over the internet on a PC, tablet or other device is capped just like any other service, access via the cable box is not metered. That distinction doesn't sit well with subscribers and consumer groups arguing for net neutrality, particularly as the CRTC is in the midst of hearings over usage-based internet billing. While that case hasn't been decided, our own ruling is already in and is firmly against Shaw, or anyone else, advertising based on advantages that exist only due to policies it created in the first place.

Continue reading Shaw Cable's Netflix competitor bypasses bandwidth caps on its way to the TV

Shaw Cable's Netflix competitor bypasses bandwidth caps on its way to the TV originally appeared on Engadget on Sat, 16 Jul 2011 15:44:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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26/05/2011 - ESPN will go all MPEG-4 in July
For better or worse, ESPN is planning to pull its MPEG-2 feeds at the end of June and transmit to affiliates solely in MPEG-4. Like HBO, ESPN already transmits all of its channels in MPEG-4 via satellite and will save money by cutting out the older backups, but since most cable companies are still sending streams to customers in MPEG-2 (although some are following DirecTV's lead) they'll need to transcode the signal an extra time which could affect the picture quality. Multichannel News mentions ESPN is supplying the necessary Motorola decoders to affiliates that need them, at this point all we can do is wait until July and see if there's any notable difference in sports quality on our end of the pipe.

[Thanks, Chevelleman]

ESPN will go all MPEG-4 in July originally appeared on Engadget HD on Thu, 26 May 2011 15:45:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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29/03/2011 - Netflix Canada announces new bandwidth management settings for capped users
The second bit of news for Canadian Netflixers in less than 24 hours deals with the other pressing issue facing the service in the Great White North: bandwidth caps. While they exist in the U.S., many Canadian ISPs have set the max amount of data allowed at much lower levels and they may cut further if a recent CRTC decision on usage-based billing stands. In response, starting today Netflix.ca accounts all have a new Manage Video Quality setting that lets users select Good / Better / Best bitrates as defaults for their video streams. According to CPO Neil Hunt's blog post, previously watching 30 hours of Netflix would typically consume up to 30GB of data, while now it can be as low as 9GB under the "Good" setting. Of course, dropping bitrate means lowering picture quality accordingly, despite promises that "the experience continues to be great." Even with HD and 5.1 audio available, PQ probably isn't your highest priority if you've turned to streaming, but it remains to be seen if customers find the compromise suitable, and whether a similar option comes to U.S. users facing similarly limited connections.

[Thanks to everyone who sent this in]

Netflix Canada announces new bandwidth management settings for capped users originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 28 Mar 2011 23:09:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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27/01/2011 - Netflix's ISP report card is much less interesting now that it's out
As promised, Netflix has released performance statistics for U.S. and Canadian ISPs, culled from the many HD streams it provides. Unfortunately there's not much enlightening information to be found, while Charter did rank at the top in overall average bitrate the other major cable ISPs like Comcast, Cox and Time Warner weren't far behind, with only the smaller DSL providers appearing to lag behind and Clearwire's 4G service at the absolute lowest (no mobile data here, these were averaged from HD streams and devices only.) The most interesting data at first glance is Verizon mired squarely in the middle, although it's hard to tell if its own DSL customers are actually dragging down the lightning performance one would expect to experience on FiOS. Also potentially impacting performance are the number of lower-speed capped packages in use, mostly on DSL lines. Ultimately, it's really difficult to pull any useful data from the charts provided but given time we may be able to observe any notable shifts in performance, if they occur. Go ahead and click through for the Canadian chart and a breakdown of the data presented and how it was accumulated.

Netflix's ISP report card is much less interesting now that it's out originally appeared on Engadget HD on Thu, 27 Jan 2011 15:25:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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25/07/2010 - Rogers reduces bandwidth caps just in time for Netflix streaming
Rogers Extreme
Oh Canada, you have all the luck; not. First you have to wait years and years after Netflix streaming comes to the states and now that you've finally got it coming, your biggest ISP drops its Lite service bandwidth caps from 25GB to 15GB. We doubt this is some big conspiracy, but it is rather unfortunate as a single 2 hour HD movie via Netflix will eat into about a fourth of your monthly allotment. And if you go over your 15GB limit, you'll pay $4 per gigabyte, so if you were planning on using the new service we'd suggest you go ahead and sign up for the Extreme service as its 80GB limit leaves a lot more room before you get hit with overage charges.

Rogers reduces bandwidth caps just in time for Netflix streaming originally appeared on Engadget HD on Sat, 24 Jul 2010 18:05:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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17/04/2009 - Enciris Launches Low-cost HD Compression Solution

Enciris Technologies has unveiled HD video compression technology aimed at solving problems with reducing bandwidth and storage requirements.
The LT-100 is a Windows Media Video/ VC-1 HD video acquisition and compression board.

16/04/2009 - Time Warner Cable scraps broadband capping plan in Rochester, NY

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It's already delayed its controversial broadband capping plan in a number of markets, and it looks like Time Warner Cable has now gone one big step further in Rochester, New York (one of the initial test markets), where it has reportedly scrapped the new tiered pricing plan altogether. As you no doubt recall, the plan was more or less modeled on cellphone pricing plans, and had intended to cap customers' data usage at a certain level and charge upwards of $1 per GB for any overages (eventually maxing out at $150 per month). That, naturally, didn't go over so well with folks, and even New York Senator Charles Schumer eventually got in on the act and complained directly to Time Warner Cable. Of course, this still doesn't officially mark the end of the pricing plan in other markets, but it certainly seems to be getting increasingly difficult for Time Warner Cable to move ahead with it.

[Thanks, Phil]

Time Warner Cable scraps broadband capping plan in Rochester, NY originally appeared on Engadget HD on Thu, 16 Apr 2009 15:22:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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16/04/2009 - Public rage stalls Time Warner trials of consumption-based internet

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Time Warner's new data capping broadband scheme was never expected to win any popularity contests, and the details of its plans are so frustrating, that this probably should not come as a surprise. Regardless, it looks like the company's plan to further roll out testing of the consumption-based billing method has been foiled, or at least stalled, because it couldn't find enough customers to participate in the testing. TWC had planned to test in several loactions, including San Antonio and Austin, Texas, but the response has apparently been so negative, and there were so many complaints, that the company has "delayed" the trials until October. So... maybe if we keep moaning about it the plan will be abandoned altogether? Here's to hoping, anyway.

[Via The Register]

Public rage stalls Time Warner trials of consumption-based internet originally appeared on Engadget HD on Thu, 16 Apr 2009 11:22:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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15/04/2009 - Meru Unveils Video-Over-Wireless Infrastructure

Meru Networks has introduced what it says is the first wireless LAN solution optimised for delivering high-quality video over the new generation of IEEE 802.11n networks.
The company's Video Services Module (ViSM) is designed to address video-delivery issues specific to 802.11n networks - which are susceptible to unpredictable loss rates that can negatively impact video quality.

10/04/2009 - Time Warner Cable lays out broadband capping plans, says $150 for "unlimited" use

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In a move seemingly designed to further our frustrations with broadband providers, Time Warner Cable has soft-announced an "unlimited" package once its new data caps go into place... for an affordable $150 monthly charge. Responding to criticism over the company's plans to start capping usage and charging for overages, Landel Hobbs clarified the provider's stance, letting users know that the capping would be limited to a $75 ceiling, thus (when paired with its top tier plan) would provide "virtually unlimited" usage. Virtually unlimited. Here's a rundown of what the COO proposes:

  • A limited package for "light users" at 1GB / monthly, 768KB down / 128KB up, with overage charges of $2 / GB / month.
  • Road Runner Lite, Basic, Standard, and Turbo packages at 10GB / 20GB / 40GB / and 60GB caps, respectively, and overage charges at $1 / GB / month.
  • A big daddy, 100GB Turbo package at $75 / month with overage fees of $1 / GB, which, when coupled with that magic threshold of $75 in charges, becomes the "unlimited" plan.

We only have two questions, guys. First, how will you let end users know they're hitting caps? Right now there's no centralized solution for monitoring bandwidth. Even cell phones show minutes used, so will you give us the infrastructure for broadband monitoring? Secondly -- instead of giving users a "virtually" unlimited package, why not just sell an unlimited package at $150 a month? The impression we get is that you want to leave the door open for aggressive users, and that your capping of capping charges might be a moving target in the right situation.

[Via eWeek]

Time Warner Cable lays out broadband capping plans, says $150 for "unlimited" use originally appeared on Engadget HD on Fri, 10 Apr 2009 10:27:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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01/04/2009 - TWC moves consumption-based internet billing to more markets

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No, folks -- this is no prank. Time Warner Cable really is throwing caution (and public opinion) to the wind and moving forward with its evil consumption-based internet billing. If you'll recall, we heard that the operator was trialing the method -- which imposes premium rates on big broadband users -- back in early 2008, but now it seems it's quietly hoping to roll it out into more major markets. Starting this month, TWC will start gathering information on its customers' internet use in Austin, TX, San Antonio, TX, Rochester, NY and Greensboro, NC; if all goes "well," consumption billing will hit those markets this summer or sooner. We'll point you to the read link if you're interested in just how outrageous these capped plans look (particularly for internet TV viewers), but we'd be remiss of our duties if we didn't share this gem of a quote from TWC CEO CEO Glenn Britt: "We made a mistake early on by not defining our business based on the consumption dimension." Thanks for clarifying, Glenn-o.

[Thanks Kevin, image courtesy of Corbis]

TWC moves consumption-based internet billing to more markets originally appeared on Engadget HD on Wed, 01 Apr 2009 14:53:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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31/03/2009 - 3D Heading For Home Screens - Likely To Be Games First

More than 10 per cent of TVs sold worldwide could have 3D capability by 2011, rising to 16 per cent or 2.8bn sets by 2015.
That's the prediction of research by Screen Digest, which suggests that technological advances mean today's 3D cinema viewing experience will soon be possible at home.

23/03/2009 - Netflix lays out official response to bandwidth capping allegations

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After a small but vocal amount of Netflix users got the world thinking that it was pulling a Comcast and putting caps on computer-based Watch Instantly users, the outfit's Chief Product Officer Neil Hunt has come forward to clear the air. He makes clear that Netflix's aspiration is to "deliver to everyone the best bitrate that their broadband connection can support," also noting that congestion "could affect some users, but not others, at some times, but not always." He also notes that different titles and encodes for different playback device types "may come from different CDNs or different servers at a particular CDN, so they may have different paths and different bottlenecks." We'd encourage you to hit the read link for the full explanation, but we're already seeing enraged Roku users bark back by his dodging of the so-called out-of-sync audio issue that's evidently still present. We'll go ahead and warn you, Netflix -- you can't please 'em all.

Netflix lays out official response to bandwidth capping allegations originally appeared on Engadget HD on Mon, 23 Mar 2009 15:53:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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16/03/2009 - Is Netflix putting caps on computer-based Watch Instantly users?

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Is Netflix putting caps on computer-based Watch Instantly users?
Depending on your choice of computing platform, possession of dedicated streaming hardware, and love of otherwise forgettable '80s films, Netflix's Watch Instantly service is either a godsend or a gimmick. Regardless, nobody likes arbitrary bandwidth caps, and that's what Riyad Kalla at The "Break it Down" Blog claims to have spotted, finding that Watch streams on his Xbox take multiple minutes to buffer, but that those on his PC (using the same connection) can take hours -- if they work at all. Doing a little snooping he found he was being capped to about 50kbps per download thread on his PC, but if he spawned ten such threads he was able to get over 700kbps. Something, it seems, is issuing a per-thread cap, but is it really Netflix? Or, rather, is it his Qwest DSL line doing a ham-fisted job of managing bandwidth? We've seen similar issues intermittently, but nothing consistent, so we're not quite ready to call this an internet-wide conspiracy just yet, but would love to hear about your streaming experiences lately.

[Via Slashdot]

Is Netflix putting caps on computer-based Watch Instantly users? originally appeared on Engadget HD on Mon, 16 Mar 2009 07:10:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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05/03/2009 - TI Unveils Video Processor Aimed at Removing Format Concerns

Texas Instruments has launched a new video processor specifically aimed at removing video designers' concerns about video format support, network bandwidth or system storage capacity limitations.
Called the TMS320DM365 DaVinci, the processor includes production-qualified H.264, MPEG-4, MPEG-2, MJPEG and VC1 codecs.

17/12/2008 - Movial Launches HD Video Calling for PCs

Movial has announced a new software application that offers PC-to-PC, and PC-to-Mobile HD video.
Victor Donselaar, president of Movial, said the Communicator PC 7.2 HD video calling technology significantly reduces the CPU and bandwidth utilization compared to other technologies.
He said this enables users to run multiple applications at the same time.

14/10/2008 - Flood Of Content Predicted For Real-time HDTV Video Streaming

While more operators are beginning to offer HD video-on-demand services, live streaming video continues to pose infrastructure and bandwidth problems.
HDTV.biz-news.com spoke to Alex Mashinsky, CEO of DigiMeld, about the challenges of streaming video - and developments that could open-up the service to millions of viewers.

04/09/2008 - HD test success spells bandwidth boost

Test transmissions in the UK have successfully received high def pictures compliant to the DVB-T2 standard using a real-time demodulator.
The BBC, which performed the tests, says this is the first time anywhere in the world that a live end-to-end DVB-T2 chain has been demonstrated.

30/08/2008 - Comcast set to begin bandwidth capping come October 1st

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You hear so much tough-talk and blustery grand-standing these days over data capping that it's hard to take any of it too seriously. A recent announcement by Comcast, however, is sending chills down the collective spine of Engadget (and seriously threatening to put a crunch on Thomas Ricker's... er, "movie" downloads). The company recently confirmed that it will begin capping its residential broadband service at 250GB per month (or roughly 124 SD movies) come October 1st, and could simply terminate customers who violate the cap more than twice. Of course, 250GB is a pretty large chunk of bandwidth, so you'll have to be entertaining some pretty hefty habits to break that bank. Then again, who likes the Man breathing down their pipeline?
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21/08/2008 - Bandwidth restraints hindering New Zealand's Freeview HD expansion

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Oh noes! Merely months after Freeview execs were celebrating the surprising uptick in Freeview HD users, in flies word that bandwidth is already becoming an issue. You see, Freeview was initially launched as a "satellite only service using MPEG-2 video compression software," while the HD terrestrial component uses MPEG-4. Transponder space on the Optus D1 satellite is "rapidly being used up, and any further expansion of data bandwidth would require Freeview broadcasters to purchase more space from Optus." If the old MPEG-2 system was suddenly canned and replaced with MPEG-4, every last satellite Freeview user would be forced to buy a new set-top-box. We shouldn't have to explain the glaringly obvious problem with that scenario. Thus, the only stop-gap solution is to simulcast the signals, which obviously requires oodles of bandwidth. Unfortunately, broadcasters are gun-shy about dropping even more cash to expand the available space without assurance of a good return on their original investment, so as of now, expansion plans wait while bigwigs figure out where to get more funding.
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